Video

John Worley of San Jose Jazz gave an enchanting performance on June 19, 2014 for the Museum’s Third Thursday Tech Connect. Worley improvised on trumpet and flugelhorn to Alan Rath’s sculpture “Absolutely,” featured in Initial Public Offering. Watch as the sculpture comes alive and dances to the sounds of jazz! 

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Great info about the print that inspired Chitra Ganesh’s 2010 painting, Melancolia (Sorrow’s Refrain): http://collection.sjmusart.org/VieO2201?sid=669&x=622775
albrightknox:

Albrecht Dürer, Melencolia I, 1514
Albrecht Dürer’s 1514 print, Melencolia I, is arguably one of the most famous prints of the Renaissance period, if not the entire scope of art history. Two versions of this print are currently on view as part of the exhibition Albrecht Dürer: Highlights from the Collection through July 6. Both prints, which entered the Collection as part of major gifts to the Albright-Knox, are second impressions, meaning the plate used to create the print was altered slightly by the artist after the first round of prints was created. While not all later impressions were created by the artist, it is firmly believed these prints were made by Dürer’s own hands.
The work itself has been debated and discussed throughout art history and there are many meanings associated with it. The figure depicted in the center is a winged female who appears to be brooding and is intended by the artist to be a visual representation of the melancholic state of being. This is supported by the abandoned tools lying at her feet and the compass depicted idly in her hand. The bat-like creature in the background bears the title of this painting as he flys over the watery landscape, and the rainbow could be seen as an indication of an apocalyptic, world-ending event.
The artist is making the statement that being in a state of melacholy can cause one to stop doing what they need to be doing. In this work, the figure has stopped creating. It has been argued that Melencolia I contains a personal element: Dürer intended the figure and the work to represent the life of the artist. Dürer is expressing how being an artist can be depressing because it is a difficult burden to have so much imagination that one can become depressed when he cannot give life to his creative imaginings through artistic output.
Dürer also had a great interest in mathematics and geometry, which is demonstrated in this work. The square on the wall behind the figure and under the bell is known as a “magic square,” a construction in which all four rows of figures add up to the same number no matter which direction the rows are added. In this instance, the numbers always add up to thirty-four. The magic square was a fairly new concept at the time and it is believed that Dürer learned of it during his travels in Italy. The depicition of this magic square is the first time this figure appears in a work in Northern Europe, and illustrates Dürer’s great interest in mathematics.
Albrecht Dϋrer (German, 1471–1528). Melencolia I, 1514. Engraving, edition 2/50, 9 1/4 x 7 1/4 inches (23.49 x 18.41 cm.). Gift of Frederic P. Norton, 1999.

Great info about the print that inspired Chitra Ganesh’s 2010 painting, Melancolia (Sorrow’s Refrain): http://collection.sjmusart.org/VieO2201?sid=669&x=622775

albrightknox:

Albrecht Dürer, Melencolia I, 1514

Albrecht Dürer’s 1514 print, Melencolia I, is arguably one of the most famous prints of the Renaissance period, if not the entire scope of art history. Two versions of this print are currently on view as part of the exhibition Albrecht Dürer: Highlights from the Collection through July 6. Both prints, which entered the Collection as part of major gifts to the Albright-Knox, are second impressions, meaning the plate used to create the print was altered slightly by the artist after the first round of prints was created. While not all later impressions were created by the artist, it is firmly believed these prints were made by Dürer’s own hands.

The work itself has been debated and discussed throughout art history and there are many meanings associated with it. The figure depicted in the center is a winged female who appears to be brooding and is intended by the artist to be a visual representation of the melancholic state of being. This is supported by the abandoned tools lying at her feet and the compass depicted idly in her hand. The bat-like creature in the background bears the title of this painting as he flys over the watery landscape, and the rainbow could be seen as an indication of an apocalyptic, world-ending event.

The artist is making the statement that being in a state of melacholy can cause one to stop doing what they need to be doing. In this work, the figure has stopped creating. It has been argued that Melencolia I contains a personal element: Dürer intended the figure and the work to represent the life of the artist. Dürer is expressing how being an artist can be depressing because it is a difficult burden to have so much imagination that one can become depressed when he cannot give life to his creative imaginings through artistic output.

Dürer also had a great interest in mathematics and geometry, which is demonstrated in this work. The square on the wall behind the figure and under the bell is known as a “magic square,” a construction in which all four rows of figures add up to the same number no matter which direction the rows are added. In this instance, the numbers always add up to thirty-four. The magic square was a fairly new concept at the time and it is believed that Dürer learned of it during his travels in Italy. The depicition of this magic square is the first time this figure appears in a work in Northern Europe, and illustrates Dürer’s great interest in mathematics.

Albrecht Dϋrer (German, 1471–1528). Melencolia I, 1514. Engraving, edition 2/50, 9 1/4 x 7 1/4 inches (23.49 x 18.41 cm.). Gift of Frederic P. Norton, 1999.

Source: albrightknox
Photo Set

Art campers examine the prints they made earlier this week and learn about a pastel project based on Ed Ruscha’s paintings in “Legacy: The Emily Fisher Landau Collection.” 

Photo Set

Yesterday, our Summer Art Campers created paper mache hands inspired by Tim Hawkinson’s “Scout,” featured in Initial Public Offering. Hawkinson lashed together pieces of cardboard boxes discarded by the garment factory beneath his studio to create his sculpture - a headless figure with absurdly oversized hands. 

Photo Set

We kicked off our Kids Summer Art Camp this week with photography and abstract art! Our 9-11 year old campers made DIY pinhole cameras using cardboard boxes, foil, and mini magnifying glasses. These cameras didn’t capture an image; they showed an inverted view of an image, like that of a traditional film camera. Our 6-8 year old campers created abstract paintings inspired by the Willem de Kooning piece featured in “Legacy: The Emily Fisher Landau Collection.” More art camp photos to come throughout the week! 

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We ask visitors to the exhibition David Levinthal: MAKE BELIEVE to leave behind a “trading card” about their favorite childhood toy. One visitor couldn’t contain the passion to just one card!

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LISTEN, STEEL

(A poem by Jennifer Swanton Brown inspired by Stephanie Syjuco’s International Orange featured in Initial Public Offering)

“Listen, steel,”
“listen,” said the engineers to the towers:
“Listen to the voices of the ferries,
and of the nearby hills,
even the ocean and the sky
have voices that speak, that count.”
“Steel, you will have to stand
through the changing seasons.
Your name will be taken into the mouths
and onto the wings. Your song
will be highly pleasing
and unusual in the realm.”
“The black water, the grey sky,
the aluminum sea gulls
will look to you for a returned music. 
One vermillion bird, 
one terra cotta grain of sand.”
“Listen, steel, to the voices
and with your molecular symphony,
carry our message of admiration.”
“Our message,” said the engineers,
“will be in your voice for anyone 
who wants the news.”
“The bridge news, steel, is you.”

Poem (c) Jennifer Swanton Brown. From the 5th Annual Poetry Invitational presented by San Jose Museum of Art and Poetry Center San Jose, April 17, 2014. 

Image: 

Stephanie Syjuco
The International Orange Commemorative Store (A Proposition), 2012
Mixed-media installation
Commissioned by the FOR-SITE Foundation as part of the exhibition “International Orange” and on the occasion of the Golden Gate Bridge’s 75 Year Anniversary
Gift of the artist and Catharine Clark Gallery
2013.04

 

 

 

Photo Set

thegetty:

Winter is coming. All men must die. And Game of Thrones is back!

Stay tuned each week as we unpack Sunday’s episodes through masterpieces.

Echoes of the carnage of battle – sounds all too familiar to medieval warriors – filled last night’s episode of Game of Thrones.  This week’s visual recap features several images from the 15th century World Chronicle, since after all battles do make for legendary stories filled with plenty of bloodshed and formidable enemies like mammoths, vicious foreign tribes, and giants (imagined foes even in the ancient world).  When preparing for battle, some retreat to study the wisdom found in books, others spy on enemy movements, and some are asked to defend the walls of centuries-old fortifications.  When the situation looks bleak, be sure to have a hungry wolf at hand.

Brilliant recap of this weeks GOT from the Getty.

Source: thegetty
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It Was An Accident 

(A poem by Kimberly Escamilla inspired by Marc Pally’s “He Will Never Get It” featured in Initial Public Offering) 

No one saw the plane.
Or maybe someone saw it,
low-flying over a forgotten island.
But now we doubt. We weave tales.

Xray, ping, thousands of clicks
across the world. We want to think
we see it. But Ms. Love and the experts
are wrong— again and again.

So much pulls our eyes away
from the 239, the steady streaks.
The patchwork of sea.
Hours fold into weeks and updates.

Why are we drawn to the marigold?
Is it a vanishing act or
a chance smudge
on the screen at a control station?

Every passenger, every scout
Every eye on the canvas
has skeletons, unfortunate photos
words that we wished were redacted.

There’s a rush for the black box,
its faint pulse, a glimmer of meaning.
The disaster—orchestrated or not—
wants to remain eclipsed.

Maybe we don’t have eyes that see,
the moments on the graphite tarmac,
the idle conversations
the silent ascent.

Poem (c) Kimberly Escamilla. From the 5th Annual Poetry Invitational presented by San Jose Museum of Art and Poetry Center San Jose, April 17, 2014. 

Image: 

Marc Pally
He Will Never Get It 
Oil, acrylic, graphite, and varnish on canvas
Painting 
Gift of Harold and Loretta Gambill 2002 Revocable Trust, 2011.05

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Happy National Donut Day! Look in the front right for the donut in ceramic artist David Gilhooly’s #10 Sampler, 1989. More info:
http://collection.sjmusart.org/Obj1821?sid=3361&x=620126

Happy National Donut Day! Look in the front right for the donut in ceramic artist David Gilhooly’s #10 Sampler, 1989. More info:

http://collection.sjmusart.org/Obj1821?sid=3361&x=620126